Bard Writes a New Year… New Career …Essay

Turning the Page: A New Year, A New Career Journey

As the chimes ring and fireworks paint the sky, a familiar feeling stirs within – the crisp, tingling energy of a new year. It’s a blank page, unmarred by ink, an invitation to write a bold new chapter in the story of our lives. For many, this whispers promises of change, and for me, it resonates with the yearning for a professional reinvention.

The past year has been a time of introspection. I’ve diligently toiled within the familiar walls of my current job, yet a subtle dissonance lingers. The tasks, once challenging, now feel routine, the goals predictable. My skills, like un-watered plants, wilt on the shelf, yearning for new soil, new sunlight. I know deep down, it’s time to turn the page.

This New Year’s resolution isn’t about hastily scribbling out a destination on this blank page. It’s about crafting a map, one guided by self-discovery. I’ll embark on a quest to rediscover my passions, identify the skills that light my fire, and map them onto a career landscape that resonates with my values. Networking events, online courses, and open-minded conversations will be my compass, helping me navigate the uncharted waters of possibility.

Fear, of course, whispers warnings. Leaving the known is a leap of faith, but I choose to see it as a dance with courage. I’ll remind myself that growth lies beyond comfort, that sometimes, the most beautiful chapters begin with an empty page.

This New Year, I embrace the unknown with open arms. I commit to charting a new career path, one paved with purpose, passion, and the thrill of the unexplored. It’s time to step out of the confines of routine and write my own professional legacy. As the countdown ends and the confetti settles, I whisper a silent promise to myself – this year, I rewrite my career story. It will be a tale of transformation, one worthy of the blank page before me.

AI’s Prediction for Job and Skills that will be in Most Demand over the Next Decade

Best Jobs for the Next Decade

The world is constantly changing, and so is the job market. As technology advances and new industries emerge, some jobs become obsolete while others become more in-demand. If you’re thinking about your future career, it’s important to choose a field that is expected to grow in the coming years.

Here is a list of some of the best jobs for the next decade, based on projections from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics:

Healthcare workers: The aging population and increasing rates of chronic diseases are driving a growing demand for healthcare workers. Some of the most in-demand healthcare jobs in the next decade include nurse practitioners, physician assistants, home health aides, and personal care aides.
Tech workers: The tech industry is one of the fastest-growing sectors in the economy, and there is a high demand for skilled workers. Some of the most in-demand tech jobs in the next decade include software engineers, data scientists, information security analysts, and cloud engineers.
Green energy workers: The transition to renewable energy is creating new jobs in the solar, wind, and geothermal industries. Some of the most in-demand green energy jobs in the next decade include solar photovoltaic installers, wind turbine service technicians, and energy efficiency auditors.
Business and management professionals: Businesses of all sizes need skilled professionals to help them manage their operations and grow their businesses. Some of the most in-demand business and management jobs in the next decade include accountants, financial analysts, marketing managers, and human resources managers.
Educators: The demand for teachers is expected to grow in the next decade, as schools strive to keep up with the growing population and changing needs of students. Some of the most in-demand teaching jobs in the next decade include special education teachers, STEM teachers, and early childhood education teachers.
In addition to the specific jobs listed above, there are a number of general skills that will be in high demand in the next decade. These include:

Problem-solving skills: The ability to identify and solve problems is essential in any job, but it will be especially important in the future as workers face new challenges and opportunities.
Communication skills: The ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing, is also essential in any job. In the future, workers will need to be able to collaborate with people from different backgrounds and cultures.
Critical thinking skills: The ability to think critically and analyze information is essential for making good decisions. In the future, workers will need to be able to adapt to change and make decisions quickly and effectively.
Technological skills: As technology continues to advance, workers will need to have strong technological skills. This includes being able to use basic computer software and being familiar with the latest technologies in your field.
If you’re looking for a career that is in high demand and expected to grow in the next decade, consider one of the jobs or skills listed above. With the right education and training, you can position yourself for a successful and rewarding career.

Labor Day! Celebrate the Worker! On-site, Remote and Hybrid as Work Continues to Evolve

This weekend we honor the contributions and achievements of American workers. Looking back on history of this American holiday makes it as relevant today’s workers, on-site, hybrid and remote.  The location and nature of work continues to evolve but the workers remain as important as ever.  Celebrate the worker!

The Labor Day holiday originated in the late 19th century during the labor movement, when workers struggled for better working conditions, wages, and hours.

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated in New York City on September 5, 1882. It was organized by the Central Labor Union, a coalition of trade unions. The holiday quickly spread to other states, and by 1894, 23 states had adopted it. In that year, President Grover Cleveland signed a law making the first Monday in September of each year a national holiday.

Labor Day is now a time for Americans to reflect on the contributions of workers to the nation’s economy and well-being. It is also a time for workers to relax and enjoy the fruits of their labor.

Here are some of the key events in the history of Labor Day:

  • 1882: The first Labor Day holiday is celebrated in New York City.
  • 1884: The Knights of Labor adopt a resolution that the first Monday in September be considered Labor Day.
  • 1894: President Grover Cleveland signs a law making the first Monday in September of each year a national holiday.
  • 1909: The first Labor Day parade is held in Washington, D.C.
  • 1938: The Fair Labor Standards Act is passed, establishing a national minimum wage and a maximum workweek of 40 hours.
  • 1971: The Employment Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) is passed, providing retirement benefits for workers.

Labor Day is a reminder of the importance of workers’ rights and the contributions that workers make to the economy. It is also a time to celebrate the achievements of workers and to reflect on the progress that has been made in improving working conditions and workers rights.

 

Jobs Likely to Be Eliminated by AI

There are a number of jobs that are most likely to be eliminated by AI in the near future. These include:

  • Data entry: AI-powered machines can perform data entry tasks faster and more accurately than humans.
  • Customer service: AI chatbots and voice assistants can handle routine customer service queries, reducing the need for human interaction.
  • Telemarketing: AI-powered telemarketing systems can make calls and generate leads without the need for human agents.
  • Truck driving: Self-driving trucks are already being developed and could soon replace human truck drivers.
  • Factory work: AI-powered robots are increasingly being used in factories to perform tasks such as welding, painting, and assembly.
  • Accounting: AI-powered accounting software can automate many of the tasks that are currently performed by accountants.
  • Legal work: AI-powered legal research tools can help lawyers find and analyze legal precedents.
  • Journalism: AI-powered news writing tools can generate news articles that are indistinguishable from those written by humans.

These are just a few of the jobs that are most likely to be eliminated by AI in the near future. As AI technology continues to develop, it is likely that even more jobs will be automated.

It is important to note that not all jobs will be eliminated by AI. Some jobs, such as those that require creativity, critical thinking, and social interaction, are less likely to be automated. However, even these jobs may be affected by AI, as AI-powered tools are developed to help humans perform these tasks more efficiently.

The rise of AI is a major challenge for the workforce. However, it also presents an opportunity for new jobs to be created. As AI automates tasks, it will free up human workers to focus on more creative and strategic work. Additionally, new jobs will be created in the field of AI itself, as well as in the industries that are disrupted by AI.

The future of work is uncertain, but it is clear that AI will have a significant impact on the workforce. It is important to be prepared for this change by developing the skills that will be in demand in the future. These skills include creativity, critical thinking, problem-solving, and social interaction.

2022 Verses 2023 Job Market

The job market in 2023 is vastly different than it was in 2022. Here are some of the key differences:

  • The number of job openings is much higher. In February 2023, there were 11.3 million job openings in the United States, compared to 6.9 million in February 2022. This means that there are more jobs available than there are people looking for work.
  • The unemployment rate is much lower. The unemployment rate in February 2023 was 3.6%, compared to 3.9% in February 2022. This means that there are fewer people unemployed, which is putting upward pressure on wages.
  • The demand for workers in certain industries is very high. The industries with the highest demand for workers in 2023 include healthcare, technology, and transportation. These industries are all growing rapidly, and they need more workers to keep up with demand.
  • The job market is more competitive. With so many job openings and so few people unemployed, the job market is more competitive than ever before. This means that job seekers need to stand out from the crowd if they want to get hired.

So, how can you succeed in today’s job market? Here are a few tips:

  • Network with people in your field. Networking is one of the best ways to find out about job openings and get your foot in the door.
  • Tailor your resume and cover letter to each job you apply for. Make sure your application materials highlight your skills and experience that are relevant to the specific job.
  • Be prepared to sell yourself during interviews. Be confident and articulate when you’re talking about your skills and experience.
  • Don’t give up. The job search can be tough, but it’s important to stay positive and keep trying.

With a little hard work and perseverance, you can succeed in today’s competitive job market.

Here are some additional tips for differentiating yourself in the job market:

  • Highlight your soft skills. Soft skills, such as communication, teamwork, and problem-solving, are increasingly important in the workplace. Make sure you highlight your soft skills in your resume and cover letter.
  • Get certified. Certifications can demonstrate your skills and knowledge in a particular area. This can make you more attractive to employers.
  • Volunteer your time. Volunteering is a great way to gain experience and make connections. It can also help you develop your soft skills.
  • Stay up-to-date on industry trends. The job market is constantly changing. Make sure you stay up-to-date on the latest trends in your field. This will help you stay relevant and marketable.

By following these tips, you can increase your chances of success in today’s job market.

REAPPLYING AFTER A REJECTION

Career Report April – June 2022 Issue 249

Feature Story

REAPPLYING TO A COMPANY AFTER A REJECTION

When it comes to careers, persistence is an attribute that can clearly pay off – especially since employers are keen for workers who are truly interested in and passionate about their jobs. But what about when a job seeker gets rejected from a company that he wants to work for? Can he continue to pursue employment at that company, or could his persistence work against him?

According to an article published by CareerBuilder.com, job seekers shouldn’t be discouraged from applying again to a company that’s turned them down.

“When an applicant has taken the time to understand the company, the people and the customers, getting rejected the first time around should never discourage that applicant from future prospects with the firm,” said Joshua Siva, co-author of the book, “BOLD: Get Noticed, Get Hired.” Any number of reasons could have led to the rejection, he pointed out.

Siva told CareerBuilder.com that there are three things applicants should do before applying again to the same company.

The first is to understand the gap in their previous application. How? “Ideally this comes from the company through a contact involved in the hiring process, but if not, the applicant needs to be honest with themselves: ‘Did I have the experience, did I speak the company’s language, did I sell myself the right way?’ Make a list of these things, and spend whatever amount of time is needed to close the gap, and be sure to have it documented and readily demonstrated,” Siva said.

Next Siva recommended that a job seeker should connect with someone at the company in a related function. “[This is] in order to learn everything about their role, their background, how they got in, company trends, etc.,” Siva said. “It’s amazing how far asking questions can take the applicant, because at the end of it all, the potential applicant will likely get asked about their own ambitions and, when shared, who knows what doors may open via the employee.”

Finally, Siva suggested following up periodically with the human resources manager involved in the hiring process from the original rejection. In your follow up, Siva said to remind the HR manager of your résumé on file, share what progress you’ve made since and reiterate your passion for the company. “It’s always a favorable position when an applicant is on the mind of an HR professional involved with recruiting, because they constantly have visibility and support requests to fill roles.”

After you’ve been turned down by a company you may be tempted to re-apply right away, especially if there’s another job that interests you. But, according to the article, it may be in your best interest to wait it out a few months, to ensure that you’re in a situation where it would make sense for them to potentially consider you again.

 Lisa Rangel, managing director of Chamelon Resumes, an executive résumé-writing and job-search service, said that in general, it’s good to wait a minimum of three-to-six months. “There needs to be enough time to allow for a possible change in the company situation and for the person to amass additional and/or relevant skills that are different than before,” she told the online employment website.

Depending on what you’re looking for, and how important it is to work at the company versus in a particular position, you may wait until a similar position comes along, or you may be willing to work in a different function or department just to get a foot in the door, the article noted. Based on what type of position you’re applying for the second time, you should adjust your application materials as needed. But regardless of whether the position is the same or different from the original job you applied for, you need to show the company that you’ve grown.

“To be taken seriously for the competitive and coveted positions in the marketplace, those who are and aren’t currently employed need to be advancing and improving themselves as time goes on,” Siva told CareerBuilder.com. “If applying for the same role, that improvement needs to speak to closing the gaps in their previous application. If applying for a different role or function, that progress needs to demonstrate the pivot in knowledge and the commitment made to pursuing the new function of focus.

“Above all else, the applicant needs to be bolder and more creative the second time around in order to stand out from other applicants, in addition to their former self and application,” Siva added.

 News from BLK

Stock Market is tanking, interest rates are rising, inflation is at 40 year highs and the talent shortage for numerous roles continues to climb.  We at Berman Larson Kane continue to witness an increase in client job listing across almost all categories of skill sets.  Demand has not yet created a large percentage increase in salaries; however, we do see this soon having a high chance of becoming a reality.

So, if you are a jobseeker your employment prospects continue to be excellent.  If you are an employer competition for top-talent continues to be highly competitive.

We at Berman Larson Kane celebrated our 42nd year in business and thank all for your support.  Our prior inflation experience suggests that if history repeats itself; we will see a high rate of turnover in all job categories.  Both a challenging and good, exciting time for ALL.

NEWS FROM BLK

Inflation, health risks, hybrid work from home options and record job listings are all contributing to a continuous growth in the competitive war for top talent.   We at Berman Larson Kane have been sharping our proprietary ATS and AI resources to uncover the hidden talent in the market for our clients.

As for job seekers the record number of listings has created an optimum year for seeking new employment.

2022 will bring a lot of movement in the job market and we at Berman Larson Kane’s 40 plus years of experience are reminder of early 1980’s as wage inflation and competition for talent wars emerge.

I assure all job seekers and employers that we will continue to provide the best samples of jobs and candidates that the market has to offer.  We so look forward to these exciting challenges in the job market.  Stay well and healthy!

Pandemic Unemployment and Thanksgiving

We must be grateful for our health, family and our jobs as unemployment continues to rise in numerous sectors of our economy.

During this Thanksgiving Holiday let us remember the millions of good folks who are adversely affected by our unemployment numbers as this pandemic spreads wildly across our country and the world.

Over the past decades the personal painful histories that I have witnessed, due to no job or meaningful work, continues to be heart wrenching and today with the health crises all around us this pain is experienced by way to many good people.

During this day of thanks, I encourage each of you as HR professionals to lend a hand, take a phone call, review a resume, coach an interview or pass on some advice to a challenged job-seeker.  We all have a special gift of knowledge and compassion that can only help the unemployed.

As president of our organization I assure you that we continue our community out-reach program to assist all job-seekers with their efforts to gain solid employment. Our programs during the past 12 years have assisted numerous individuals.  My wish is by Thanksgiving 2021 that we are all be healthy and the need for unemployment  service will return to more acceptable levels.

We at Berman Larson Kane, thank each of you for your business support during our forty year history.  Have a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday and take a moment to please be thankful for your job and take a moment to coach a less fortunate job-seeker.

Making Yourself Indispensable

Bob Larson, CPC

April – June 2020 – Career Report –  Issue 241

Making Yourself Indispensable During and After the Shut-Down

Your company, like most others, will go through many transitions during this pandemic shut-down.  If you have managed to survive or have been furloughed until the isolation is lifted; your company viewed you as a well-regarded employee who possesses skills and knowledge that make you an important member of its team. But now you want to do more than just hold on. You want to become an indispensable employee. In the following Q&A article from The New York Times during the 2008-09 recession, careers columnist Eilene Zimmerman offers a variety of ideas to help you to succeed.

Q. How can you make yourself more valuable to your company and improve your chances of a future promotion?

You can enhance your odds of a promotion by suggesting ways to solve problems, taking the initiative on projects, sharpening your skills and showing a willingness to help others. Find ways that the company can earn more money and spend less, said Larry Myler, chief executive of the consulting firm More or Less Inc., in Provo, Utah. When you see ways to cut costs or streamline processes, develop a plan and write a proposal, Myler said.

Presenting that to your manager “shows you’re taking initiative, which makes you more valuable,” he told the newspaper. “You will be seen as a person who is mindful of the company’s bottom line and who has the ability to do something about it. That’s huge.”

Q. How do you carve out a niche for yourself in the company–one that sets you apart as an expert in a specific area and how do you manage to do that while handling your usual job responsibilities?

To create that niche, focus on what you already know, rather than picking a new area and then trying to learn all about it, said Vaughan Evans, a career strategist in London. “Let’s say you are very proficient with numbers, quantitative work and using the Excel program,” Evans said. “Why not become a master at Excel so that within the origination, you are the go-to person for that program?”

Building on your strengths – and letting your weaknesses go – will enable you to carve out a niche. Keep in mind, though, that your area of expertise needs to be important to the organization, Evans added.

Q. Should you ask your manager whether the company would be willing to pay for additional training?

Some career experts say that during challenging economic times, employees should be cautious about asking their companies to cover costs for training, conferences or additional education. Myler suggested that if you do ask, be frugal about it. “Asking your company to cover the cost of attendance at a pricey conference probably won’t go over well,” he said. “Instead, ask if they will pay for the conference notes—usually a nominal cost—and do self-study instead.”

Ingrid Stabb, co-author of “The Career With You,” suggested checking with human resources to see whether tuition reimbursement is among your benefits. That money can be used to pay for a variety of courses that further your expertise in a particular area, she said. If the company won’t pay, you might want to consider footing the bill yourself for evening or weekend classes or for online courses.

Q. What’s the best way to make management aware of steps you are taking to enhance your skills and expertise, without sounding obnoxious about it?

Show your strengths in a way that benefits your boss and everyone in your department. Stabb said: “If your strength is organizing data, for example, and you know there is all this data your boss has but hasn’t organized, create a spreadsheet table that makes it easier for the department to access the information, and then offer to lead a brown-bag lunch presentation to explain how to read it.

Being helpful toward and protective of others is another way to showcase your knowledge – in a nonthreatening way. This applies to both colleagues and managers. For example, when you have information that can be useful to others, share it, said Sandra Naiman, owner of the executive coaching firm SNM Partners in Denver and author of “High Achievers Secret Codebook: The Unwritten Rules for Success at Work.” This could include articles in trade journals, information on the company’s intranet and relevant online sources.

When others go out of their way to help you in a similar manner, always give them credit by sending an e-mail message to their boss to describe the help, she told the newspaper.

“The bottom line is you want to be known and relied upon by many people in the organization as possible,” Naiman said. “The more people who depend upon you for their success, the more valuable you become.”

NEWS from BLK

Like the rest of the world we at BLK are scrambling to establish a new normal as the business world is on hold and have continued our virtual model.  Our talent discovery team is devoting its time to a few medical clients that are adjusting to the changing demands put onto the healthcare system.  Other members of our team are putting energies into building talent ques so we are prepared for staffing demands once the non-essential business ban is lifted.

April 1st was BLK’s  40th Anniversary of assisting  job seekers and employers with their hiring challenges.  That’s right “April Fools Day”  I so wish this was a dream that we are experiencing.  As president of Berman Larson Kane for the past 40 years I have no doubt that a new and better normal will emerge as we all return to good health.  Having weathered numerous unanticipated economic storms, recessions, world events and work restructurings I have no doubt that ”this too shall pass”.

Stay healthy. Keep your social distance and virus FREE.

March 2020 Career Report Issue 240

HOW TO HIRE THE RIGHT EMPLOYEES

Bob Larson, CPC

March 2020 – Career Report –  Issue 240

HOW TO HIRE THE RIGHT EMPLOYEES

Successfully recruiting new employees to your team can be a grueling process. It can take months to find someone who’s the perfect fit for both the position and company culture – and sometimes, when the going’s really rough, it can be tempting to settle on someone who’s good…but not great.

But according to an article published by the blog Hubspot.com, bad hiring decisions are not only frustrating for you and your team, they can also jeopardize the longevity of other valuable employees, slow down productivity, and cost your company money.

So what should hiring managers look for in candidates to ensure they aren’t setting themselves up for failure?

According to the article, when looking for prospective employees, focus on those who you feel possess the following six qualities:

  • Values Match the Company’s Message – Knowing what values the individual is looking for in a company helps better understand whether or not they will fit the organization office culture.
  • A Desire to Learn – Hiring managers want individuals on their team who want to continue learning. During the interview process, look for candidates who show excitement towards growth.
  • Long-term Potential – With turnover being extremely costly, look for new hires that show a long-term interest in the company and aspire to work their way up the corporate ladder.
  • Enthusiasm For the Position –For a new hire, you want someone who is assertive in performing necessary responsibilities, portrays excitement for daily tasks and is inspired to contribute to the company.
  • Good Communications Skills – It is necessary to have employees who can respectfully communicate and articulate the company’s message clearly to business professionals and clients so that the organization’s reputation remains positive.
  • Trustworthiness and Responsibility — An employer needs to be able to put full trust in their employee’s ability to perform and complete tasks accurately in order to maintain a positive and productive office culture. Look for employees who are good with taking direction and take responsibility for their work.

By staying focused on these six qualities, you’ll be weeding out those who can have a negative impact on your business and enhance your chances of hiring someone who can contribute to your organization’s growth and success.

NEWS FROM BLK

Coronavirus, Primary Elections, Global Warming and Stock Market Gyrations?  How does one predict the effects on the job market?  We have no idea.  Good news is February’s job creation numbers are predicted to be in the high one hundred thousands.  So short term we are ok ….long term is a wild card.

As for this moment we are witnessing shortages in several niches with big data candidates leading the shortage.  Based on the recent past we are assuming healthcare’s climb will continue on a rapid upward path with some retraction in many of the service jobs including retail and hospitality.

As president of Berman Larson Kane we thank all for their business and look forward to celebrating our 40th anniversary on April 1st.  It has been a long and wild ride for 4 decades and the future appears to continue to generate extreme ups and downs.