Berman Larson Kane Privacy Policy

Effective Date: June 20, 2024
This Privacy Policy describes how Berman Larson Kane (“we,” “us,” or “our”) collects, uses, and discloses your information when you use our website www.jobsbl.com and our services, including our texting campaign (the “Services”).
Information We Collect
We collect several types of information for various purposes to improve our Services to you.
Information You Provide Directly:
o Contact information: We may collect your name, phone number, email address, resume, and other information you submit through our Website or during interactions with our representatives.
o Texting Campaign Opt-In: By opting in to receive text messages from us, you provide your phone number.
Information Collected Automatically:
o Usage Data: When you use our Website or Services, we may automatically collect information about your activity, such as the pages you visit, the time you spend on those pages, and the links you click.
o Device Information: We may collect information about the device you use to access our Website or Services, such as your device type, operating system, browser type, IP address, and device identifiers.

Use of Your Information
We use the information we collect for several purposes, including:
• To provide and improve our Services, including our texting campaign.
• To process your job applications and connect you with potential employers.
• To send you important information about our Services, including job alerts, updates, and promotions.
• To personalize your experience on our Website and Services.
• To analyze the use of our Website and Services to improve them.
• To comply with legal and regulatory requirements.

Texting Campaign
By opting in to receive text messages from us, you agree to receive job alerts, updates, and promotional messages from us. You can opt out of receiving text messages at any time by replying “STOP” to any text message you receive from us. There is no charge for opting out of our text messages, but your mobile carrier’s standard message and data rates may apply.
Sharing of Your Information
We may share your information with third-party service providers who help us operate our Website and Services. These service providers are obligated to keep your information confidential and use it only for the purposes we have disclosed.
We may also share your information with potential employers to whom you apply for jobs through our Services.
We will not share your information with any third party for marketing purposes without your consent.
Data Security
We take reasonable steps to protect the information you provide to us from unauthorized access, disclosure, alteration, or destruction. However, no internet or electronic storage system is completely secure, and we cannot guarantee the security of your information.
Your Choices
You have several choices regarding your information:
• You can choose not to provide certain information, but this may limit your ability to use some features of our Services.
• You can opt out of receiving text messages from us by replying “STOP” to any text message you receive from us.
• You can access and update your information by contacting us.
Children’s Privacy
Our Website and Services are not directed to children under the age of 13. We do not knowingly collect personal information from children under 13. If you are a parent or guardian and you believe your child has provided us with personal information, please contact us. We will take steps to remove the information from our servers.
Changes to this Privacy Policy
We may update this Privacy Policy from time to time. We will notify you of any changes by posting the new Privacy Policy on our Website.
Contact Us
If you have any questions about this Privacy Policy, please contact us:
• By email: larson@jobsbl.com
• By phone number: 201-556-2887
This Privacy Policy is effective as of the date stated above and applies to your use of the Website and Services after that date.

Bard Writes a New Year… New Career …Essay

Turning the Page: A New Year, A New Career Journey

As the chimes ring and fireworks paint the sky, a familiar feeling stirs within – the crisp, tingling energy of a new year. It’s a blank page, unmarred by ink, an invitation to write a bold new chapter in the story of our lives. For many, this whispers promises of change, and for me, it resonates with the yearning for a professional reinvention.

The past year has been a time of introspection. I’ve diligently toiled within the familiar walls of my current job, yet a subtle dissonance lingers. The tasks, once challenging, now feel routine, the goals predictable. My skills, like un-watered plants, wilt on the shelf, yearning for new soil, new sunlight. I know deep down, it’s time to turn the page.

This New Year’s resolution isn’t about hastily scribbling out a destination on this blank page. It’s about crafting a map, one guided by self-discovery. I’ll embark on a quest to rediscover my passions, identify the skills that light my fire, and map them onto a career landscape that resonates with my values. Networking events, online courses, and open-minded conversations will be my compass, helping me navigate the uncharted waters of possibility.

Fear, of course, whispers warnings. Leaving the known is a leap of faith, but I choose to see it as a dance with courage. I’ll remind myself that growth lies beyond comfort, that sometimes, the most beautiful chapters begin with an empty page.

This New Year, I embrace the unknown with open arms. I commit to charting a new career path, one paved with purpose, passion, and the thrill of the unexplored. It’s time to step out of the confines of routine and write my own professional legacy. As the countdown ends and the confetti settles, I whisper a silent promise to myself – this year, I rewrite my career story. It will be a tale of transformation, one worthy of the blank page before me.

AI’s Prediction for Job and Skills that will be in Most Demand over the Next Decade

Best Jobs for the Next Decade

The world is constantly changing, and so is the job market. As technology advances and new industries emerge, some jobs become obsolete while others become more in-demand. If you’re thinking about your future career, it’s important to choose a field that is expected to grow in the coming years.

Here is a list of some of the best jobs for the next decade, based on projections from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics:

Healthcare workers: The aging population and increasing rates of chronic diseases are driving a growing demand for healthcare workers. Some of the most in-demand healthcare jobs in the next decade include nurse practitioners, physician assistants, home health aides, and personal care aides.
Tech workers: The tech industry is one of the fastest-growing sectors in the economy, and there is a high demand for skilled workers. Some of the most in-demand tech jobs in the next decade include software engineers, data scientists, information security analysts, and cloud engineers.
Green energy workers: The transition to renewable energy is creating new jobs in the solar, wind, and geothermal industries. Some of the most in-demand green energy jobs in the next decade include solar photovoltaic installers, wind turbine service technicians, and energy efficiency auditors.
Business and management professionals: Businesses of all sizes need skilled professionals to help them manage their operations and grow their businesses. Some of the most in-demand business and management jobs in the next decade include accountants, financial analysts, marketing managers, and human resources managers.
Educators: The demand for teachers is expected to grow in the next decade, as schools strive to keep up with the growing population and changing needs of students. Some of the most in-demand teaching jobs in the next decade include special education teachers, STEM teachers, and early childhood education teachers.
In addition to the specific jobs listed above, there are a number of general skills that will be in high demand in the next decade. These include:

Problem-solving skills: The ability to identify and solve problems is essential in any job, but it will be especially important in the future as workers face new challenges and opportunities.
Communication skills: The ability to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing, is also essential in any job. In the future, workers will need to be able to collaborate with people from different backgrounds and cultures.
Critical thinking skills: The ability to think critically and analyze information is essential for making good decisions. In the future, workers will need to be able to adapt to change and make decisions quickly and effectively.
Technological skills: As technology continues to advance, workers will need to have strong technological skills. This includes being able to use basic computer software and being familiar with the latest technologies in your field.
If you’re looking for a career that is in high demand and expected to grow in the next decade, consider one of the jobs or skills listed above. With the right education and training, you can position yourself for a successful and rewarding career.

Labor Day! Celebrate the Worker! On-site, Remote and Hybrid as Work Continues to Evolve

This weekend we honor the contributions and achievements of American workers. Looking back on history of this American holiday makes it as relevant today’s workers, on-site, hybrid and remote.  The location and nature of work continues to evolve but the workers remain as important as ever.  Celebrate the worker!

The Labor Day holiday originated in the late 19th century during the labor movement, when workers struggled for better working conditions, wages, and hours.

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated in New York City on September 5, 1882. It was organized by the Central Labor Union, a coalition of trade unions. The holiday quickly spread to other states, and by 1894, 23 states had adopted it. In that year, President Grover Cleveland signed a law making the first Monday in September of each year a national holiday.

Labor Day is now a time for Americans to reflect on the contributions of workers to the nation’s economy and well-being. It is also a time for workers to relax and enjoy the fruits of their labor.

Here are some of the key events in the history of Labor Day:

  • 1882: The first Labor Day holiday is celebrated in New York City.
  • 1884: The Knights of Labor adopt a resolution that the first Monday in September be considered Labor Day.
  • 1894: President Grover Cleveland signs a law making the first Monday in September of each year a national holiday.
  • 1909: The first Labor Day parade is held in Washington, D.C.
  • 1938: The Fair Labor Standards Act is passed, establishing a national minimum wage and a maximum workweek of 40 hours.
  • 1971: The Employment Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) is passed, providing retirement benefits for workers.

Labor Day is a reminder of the importance of workers’ rights and the contributions that workers make to the economy. It is also a time to celebrate the achievements of workers and to reflect on the progress that has been made in improving working conditions and workers rights.

 

Jobs Likely to Be Eliminated by AI

There are a number of jobs that are most likely to be eliminated by AI in the near future. These include:

  • Data entry: AI-powered machines can perform data entry tasks faster and more accurately than humans.
  • Customer service: AI chatbots and voice assistants can handle routine customer service queries, reducing the need for human interaction.
  • Telemarketing: AI-powered telemarketing systems can make calls and generate leads without the need for human agents.
  • Truck driving: Self-driving trucks are already being developed and could soon replace human truck drivers.
  • Factory work: AI-powered robots are increasingly being used in factories to perform tasks such as welding, painting, and assembly.
  • Accounting: AI-powered accounting software can automate many of the tasks that are currently performed by accountants.
  • Legal work: AI-powered legal research tools can help lawyers find and analyze legal precedents.
  • Journalism: AI-powered news writing tools can generate news articles that are indistinguishable from those written by humans.

These are just a few of the jobs that are most likely to be eliminated by AI in the near future. As AI technology continues to develop, it is likely that even more jobs will be automated.

It is important to note that not all jobs will be eliminated by AI. Some jobs, such as those that require creativity, critical thinking, and social interaction, are less likely to be automated. However, even these jobs may be affected by AI, as AI-powered tools are developed to help humans perform these tasks more efficiently.

The rise of AI is a major challenge for the workforce. However, it also presents an opportunity for new jobs to be created. As AI automates tasks, it will free up human workers to focus on more creative and strategic work. Additionally, new jobs will be created in the field of AI itself, as well as in the industries that are disrupted by AI.

The future of work is uncertain, but it is clear that AI will have a significant impact on the workforce. It is important to be prepared for this change by developing the skills that will be in demand in the future. These skills include creativity, critical thinking, problem-solving, and social interaction.

2022 Verses 2023 Job Market

The job market in 2023 is vastly different than it was in 2022. Here are some of the key differences:

  • The number of job openings is much higher. In February 2023, there were 11.3 million job openings in the United States, compared to 6.9 million in February 2022. This means that there are more jobs available than there are people looking for work.
  • The unemployment rate is much lower. The unemployment rate in February 2023 was 3.6%, compared to 3.9% in February 2022. This means that there are fewer people unemployed, which is putting upward pressure on wages.
  • The demand for workers in certain industries is very high. The industries with the highest demand for workers in 2023 include healthcare, technology, and transportation. These industries are all growing rapidly, and they need more workers to keep up with demand.
  • The job market is more competitive. With so many job openings and so few people unemployed, the job market is more competitive than ever before. This means that job seekers need to stand out from the crowd if they want to get hired.

So, how can you succeed in today’s job market? Here are a few tips:

  • Network with people in your field. Networking is one of the best ways to find out about job openings and get your foot in the door.
  • Tailor your resume and cover letter to each job you apply for. Make sure your application materials highlight your skills and experience that are relevant to the specific job.
  • Be prepared to sell yourself during interviews. Be confident and articulate when you’re talking about your skills and experience.
  • Don’t give up. The job search can be tough, but it’s important to stay positive and keep trying.

With a little hard work and perseverance, you can succeed in today’s competitive job market.

Here are some additional tips for differentiating yourself in the job market:

  • Highlight your soft skills. Soft skills, such as communication, teamwork, and problem-solving, are increasingly important in the workplace. Make sure you highlight your soft skills in your resume and cover letter.
  • Get certified. Certifications can demonstrate your skills and knowledge in a particular area. This can make you more attractive to employers.
  • Volunteer your time. Volunteering is a great way to gain experience and make connections. It can also help you develop your soft skills.
  • Stay up-to-date on industry trends. The job market is constantly changing. Make sure you stay up-to-date on the latest trends in your field. This will help you stay relevant and marketable.

By following these tips, you can increase your chances of success in today’s job market.

New from BLK

 

Stock Market is tanking, interest rates are rising, inflation is at 40 year highs and the talent shortage for numerous roles continues to climb.  We at Berman Larson Kane continue to witness an increase in client job listing across almost all categories of skill sets.  Demand has not yet created a large percentage increase in salaries; however, we do see this soon having a high chance of becoming a reality.

So, if you are a jobseeker your employment prospects continue to be excellent.  If you are an employer competition for top-talent continues to be highly competitive.

We at Berman Larson Kane celebrated our 42nd year in business and thank all for your support.  Our prior inflation experience suggests that if history repeats itself; we will see a high rate of turnover in all job categories.  Both a challenging and good, exciting time for ALL.

REAPPLYING AFTER A REJECTION

Career Report April – June 2022 Issue 249

Feature Story

REAPPLYING TO A COMPANY AFTER A REJECTION

When it comes to careers, persistence is an attribute that can clearly pay off – especially since employers are keen for workers who are truly interested in and passionate about their jobs. But what about when a job seeker gets rejected from a company that he wants to work for? Can he continue to pursue employment at that company, or could his persistence work against him?

According to an article published by CareerBuilder.com, job seekers shouldn’t be discouraged from applying again to a company that’s turned them down.

“When an applicant has taken the time to understand the company, the people and the customers, getting rejected the first time around should never discourage that applicant from future prospects with the firm,” said Joshua Siva, co-author of the book, “BOLD: Get Noticed, Get Hired.” Any number of reasons could have led to the rejection, he pointed out.

Siva told CareerBuilder.com that there are three things applicants should do before applying again to the same company.

The first is to understand the gap in their previous application. How? “Ideally this comes from the company through a contact involved in the hiring process, but if not, the applicant needs to be honest with themselves: ‘Did I have the experience, did I speak the company’s language, did I sell myself the right way?’ Make a list of these things, and spend whatever amount of time is needed to close the gap, and be sure to have it documented and readily demonstrated,” Siva said.

Next Siva recommended that a job seeker should connect with someone at the company in a related function. “[This is] in order to learn everything about their role, their background, how they got in, company trends, etc.,” Siva said. “It’s amazing how far asking questions can take the applicant, because at the end of it all, the potential applicant will likely get asked about their own ambitions and, when shared, who knows what doors may open via the employee.”

Finally, Siva suggested following up periodically with the human resources manager involved in the hiring process from the original rejection. In your follow up, Siva said to remind the HR manager of your résumé on file, share what progress you’ve made since and reiterate your passion for the company. “It’s always a favorable position when an applicant is on the mind of an HR professional involved with recruiting, because they constantly have visibility and support requests to fill roles.”

After you’ve been turned down by a company you may be tempted to re-apply right away, especially if there’s another job that interests you. But, according to the article, it may be in your best interest to wait it out a few months, to ensure that you’re in a situation where it would make sense for them to potentially consider you again.

 Lisa Rangel, managing director of Chamelon Resumes, an executive résumé-writing and job-search service, said that in general, it’s good to wait a minimum of three-to-six months. “There needs to be enough time to allow for a possible change in the company situation and for the person to amass additional and/or relevant skills that are different than before,” she told the online employment website.

Depending on what you’re looking for, and how important it is to work at the company versus in a particular position, you may wait until a similar position comes along, or you may be willing to work in a different function or department just to get a foot in the door, the article noted. Based on what type of position you’re applying for the second time, you should adjust your application materials as needed. But regardless of whether the position is the same or different from the original job you applied for, you need to show the company that you’ve grown.

“To be taken seriously for the competitive and coveted positions in the marketplace, those who are and aren’t currently employed need to be advancing and improving themselves as time goes on,” Siva told CareerBuilder.com. “If applying for the same role, that improvement needs to speak to closing the gaps in their previous application. If applying for a different role or function, that progress needs to demonstrate the pivot in knowledge and the commitment made to pursuing the new function of focus.

“Above all else, the applicant needs to be bolder and more creative the second time around in order to stand out from other applicants, in addition to their former self and application,” Siva added.

 News from BLK

Stock Market is tanking, interest rates are rising, inflation is at 40 year highs and the talent shortage for numerous roles continues to climb.  We at Berman Larson Kane continue to witness an increase in client job listing across almost all categories of skill sets.  Demand has not yet created a large percentage increase in salaries; however, we do see this soon having a high chance of becoming a reality.

So, if you are a jobseeker your employment prospects continue to be excellent.  If you are an employer competition for top-talent continues to be highly competitive.

We at Berman Larson Kane celebrated our 42nd year in business and thank all for your support.  Our prior inflation experience suggests that if history repeats itself; we will see a high rate of turnover in all job categories.  Both a challenging and good, exciting time for ALL.

NEWS FROM BLK

Inflation, health risks, hybrid work from home options and record job listings are all contributing to a continuous growth in the competitive war for top talent.   We at Berman Larson Kane have been sharping our proprietary ATS and AI resources to uncover the hidden talent in the market for our clients.

As for job seekers the record number of listings has created an optimum year for seeking new employment.

2022 will bring a lot of movement in the job market and we at Berman Larson Kane’s 40 plus years of experience are reminder of early 1980’s as wage inflation and competition for talent wars emerge.

I assure all job seekers and employers that we will continue to provide the best samples of jobs and candidates that the market has to offer.  We so look forward to these exciting challenges in the job market.  Stay well and healthy!

Resign from Your Job with Grace / News from BLK

Resign from Your Job with Grace

As predicted, we are in the era of the “Great Resignation” with the most recent reports hitting record numbers of people voluntarily resigning from their jobs. As we move along the pandemic era many are reevaluating life/work balances, work from home options, high risk health service jobs and are making and planning on occupational adjustments.

In fact, one recent survey revealed that as many as 40 percent of workers say they are planning to leave their jobs. And while it may be tempting to give the boss an earful if you do land a new job, workers need to keep in mind that the way they quit can have a long term impact on their career.

Here are some tips from the newspaper article on to resign from a job on good terms:

  • Be prepared. Review your employee handbook or employment contract before announcing your decision, so you know what your company policy is regarding resignations, severance, return of company property, and pay for unused vacation time. Also, find out the company’s reference policy to see what information will be disclosed to a prospective employer. If you have another job lined up, be sure to have your offer in writing before you resign.
  • Use it or loose it. If you haven’t used vacation time and will lose it if you quit, you might want to use your time before leaving or link it to your resignation date. But if you don’t want to burn any bridges, don’t take vacation and announce your departure just after your return.
  • Make an appointment. “Be formal and make an appointment with your boss,” recommended Tanya Maslach, a San Diego, Calif., career expert who specializes in relationship management issues. “Be prepared and engaging—and be transparent,” Maslach said. She also recommends asking your boss how you can help make the transition easier. After the discussion, put your resignation in a hard-copy letter that includes your last day and any transitional help you’ve offered.
  • Give Two weeks Notice. Two weeks advance notice is still standard but experts recommend offering more time if you’ve worked at a company for more than five years. Importantly, though, you also need to be prepared to leave right away—some companies require it.
  • Don’t take the stapler. “It’s not worth it,” said Michael J. Goldfarb, president of Northridge, Calif.-based Holman HR. “If there are security cameras or coworkers with a grudge, stealing from the company doesn’t look good.” In some cases, you could also end up getting billed for the missing equipment—or even taken to court, he said.
  • Scrub your digital footprint. Clear your browser cache, remove passwords to Websites you use from work, such as your personal email or online bank account and delete any personal files on your work computer that aren’t relevant to work. Don’t delete anything work related if you’re required to keep it.
  • Be honest but remain positive. Be helpful during the exit interview, but keep responses simple and professional. Don’t use the session to lay blame or rant about the workplace. “Whatever you do, don’t confess about how much you disliked working there,” said Maslach.
  • Stay close. Consider joining an employee alumni association, which often serves as a networking group for former employees. It can be a good way to keep up with changes in the company and industry—and find leads to new jobs down the road. Lastly, make an effort to keep in touch with coworkers you worked with; they may end up in management roles.

NEWS FROM BLK

Inflation, health risks, hybrid work from home options and record job listings are all contributing to a continuous growth in the competitive war for top talent.   We at Berman Larson Kane have been sharping our proprietary ATS and AI resources to uncover the hidden talent in the market for our clients.

As for job seekers the record number of listings has created an optimum year for seeking new employment.

2022 will bring a lot of movement in the job market and we at Berman Larson Kane’s 40 plus years of experience are reminder of early 1980’s as wage inflation and competition for talent wars emerge.

I assure all job seekers and employers that we will continue to provide the best samples of jobs and candidates that the market has to offer.  We so look forward to these exciting challenges in the job market.  Stay well and healthy!